Flapjack and builders' tea

The house update. And flapjacks.

So since our original offer on the House of Bodily Fluids back in July, we really haven’t heard very much.  We didn’t really chase it as I guess we’re not in a massive hurry, but all of a sudden it kind of dawned on us that we hadn’t had any paperwork, and started to chase a bit harder.  Our solicitors, worryingly, had heard nothing at all from their solicitors.  I drove past the house and they hadn’t even STARTED clearing it, and you can imagine what a job that’s going to be.  Then we started to hear rumour that the probate wasn’t going smoothly and there were issues with the man’s business that had to be sorted before the house could be sold… Ugh.

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Frozen cupcake topper

How to make Disney Frozen cupcakes – a masterclass with Chef Jeff

One of my absolute favourite adventures while we were in Walt Disney World was a special, money can’t buy visit to Chef Jeff, Executive Chef at Disney’s beautiful Contemporary Resort, one of my top five Walt Disney World resort hotels.  Chef Jeff and his team are responsible for all the patisserie for the resort, from gorgeous special occasion cakes, to the wonderful cupcakes available in the café.

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Squidgy chocolate brownie cake

A squishy chocolate brownie cake for exam success (mostly)

So it’s been a little frantic here at English Towers.  First we had A level results, and then within a week it was GCSE results. Honestly, I really should have planned my children a little better.

Still, it was all good.  I used the hashtag #noexamswerefailedonthisday on Instagram but in truth, one exam WAS failed.  But hey, it didn’t matter.  Sam got what he needed to head out into the big wide world of university, and Charlie’s off to sixth form.

If there’s one thing I always insist upon, it’s a celebration when someone’s done something brilliant.  As parents, we spend plenty of time enforcing rules, cajoling, counselling (okay, and occasionally moaning), so when something amazing happens,  I always think it redresses the balance a bit to celebrate.  Everyone loves a pat on the back when they do something great, don’t they?

So obviously all this exam success called just such a celebration, and what better celebration is there than a whopping great warm, chocolatey, squishy brownie cake smothered in lashings of chocolate ganache?  None, that’s what…

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Scone with Greek yogurt and jam

Greek yogurt scones for Yogurt Week, 19 – 25th May 2014

Regular readers will know that I’m a huge yogurt fan, so when the lovely chaps at the Yogurt Council asked me to join in next week with yogurt week, the UK’s first celebration of everything yogurty, I knew EXACTLY what I was going to cook.

Yogurt is great for tummies, bones and muscles (it’s full of protein, calcium and vitamin B2), plus it’s a healthier alternative to cream in loads of recipes.  It’s available in a vast array of variants: low fat, Greek, fat free, fruity, chocolaty, you name it.  In fact, it’s so popular that one in five of us eats yogurt every day!

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Disney's BoardWalk Bakery

Cupcakes at the BoardWalk Bakery, Walt Disney World, Florida

So if you follow me on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook (and frankly, why wouldn’t you? There’s cake, beaches, ships and the lunatic whippet of mass destruction makes the odd appearance too), you’ll know that I’ve been visiting Walt Disney World, Florida.  I have loads to tell you – there’s news of the opening of the new Seven Dwarfs Mine Train, a review of the frankly beautiful Disney’s Wilderness Lodge resort, and masses of food, fun and breaking Disney news (Avatar!!).

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Charlie 16th birthday cheesecake

The Birthday Challenge: chocolate peanut butter cheesecake for Charlie

My baby boy is 16. How did that happen?  I’ll save you the ‘it seems like only yesterday’ speech, mostly because it doesn’t seem like only yesterday, in fact, I can barely remember those first few weeks, to be honest, plus it’s a bit yawny when parents start getting all misty eyed.  Suffice to say, we’re the proudest parents, we love him to bits and we’ll move on to the birthday cake of choice.

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Flapjacks

Weekend baking: fabulous fruity flapjacks

So, amazingly, Charlie has stuck to his rash ‘I’m not eating chocolate any more’ decision with incredibly amounts of willpower, even as we’ve been tucking into all sorts of treats we’ve been sent.  He’s not even been eating his previous post-school staple of chocolate brownies.  He is, however, still eating other treats, so I’m not overly worried that this is one of those mad teenage diets.

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Guinness cupcake with ganache

Ginger Guinness cupcakes for St Patrick’s Day

Regular English Mum readers will know that Ireland means a lot to us all here at English Towers.  In fact, it’s the reason why this little part of the interwebz even exists.  Long, long ago (eight whole years to be precise) we set off on a new adventure to the Emerald Isle and spent many happy years living first in Dublin, then later Meath and finally beautiful county Cavan.

Mr English is of Irish descent and the boys are proud of their heritage. Charlie can even wow you with a bit of Gaeilge if you ask nicely (although it’s mostly swears) so when Paddy’s Day approaches, it instills in us all a mixture of nostalgia and longing for places and friends left behind.

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shortbread biscuits

Weekend baking: quick and easy shortbread

It’s lovely to have a few perfect recipes that you can trust to work time and time again, and this is definitely one of those.

Once you’ve got the hang of shortbread, you can do so many different things with it – it’s perfect for cooking with kids (Mothers’ Day is on the way!) or it can be served as part of a dessert, say, with chocolate mousse or lemon creams.

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Red velvet cupcakes and melted marshmallow topping

Red velvet cupcakes with melted marshmallow icing

Firstly, I’d like to say – for the purists out there – that of course I know a REAL red velvet cupcake needs proper cream cheese icing.  Sadly, the object of my affections dislikes cream cheese icing.  And in fact buttercream too, so I have to be a bit more creative.  Using a marshmallow appeals to my lazy, cheaty side, and if you time it right, makes a deliciously gooey topping.  They’re obviously not going to look the same as a perfect swirl of cream cheese, but they taste divine so it doesn’t matter.

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Cherry and chocolate roulade

A cherry and chocolate roulade for Valentine’s Day

Mr English isn’t the romantic type, so we’ve never really embraced the whole flowers and chocolates thing, although we do send a card to each other (not really the same when you’re pretty certain who your secret Valentine is).  People tend to fall into two camps Valentines-wise, they either love it or hate it.  I think that if there’s a day in the year when you’re reminded to tell someone how much you love them, then so much the better.  And what better way to express your love than with cake?

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Chocolate brownie sandwich castles

Castle brownie sandwiches for Justin and the Knights of Valour

I’m not hugely creative when I’m baking. I tend to prefer substance over style (ie, a really big cake over anything too delicate or fiddly). So when the lovely chaps promoting the DVD and Blu-ray release of the new film Justin and the Knights of Valour asked me to make them some knighty/castley kind of cakes to celebrate its release, I was a bit worried.

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Chocolate chip peanut cookies small

Weekend baking: easy, step by step chocolate chip peanut cookies

Living with two teenage bottomless pits, I tend to do a lot of baking.  I’m not for a minute trying to make out it’s some kind of chore – there’s nothing I like better than pottering about in a sunny kitchen – radio on, dog bimbling around at my feet.  I bake these cookies a lot, sometimes with the addition of oats (you can find my oaty chocolate chip version here), or sometimes like this: plain, squidgy, and with lots of chocolate.  I happened to have a bit of dark and a bit of white chocolate left over, but add in whatever you have.  The peanut version are my favourite as I love the crunch it gives them.  I got sent some cute little packs of Chikas peanuts which are hand toasted so I popped a whole pack in (40g):

Ingredients

125g butter

150g brown sugar

1 egg

1 tsp vanilla extract

200g plain flour

100g chocolate, chopped

Couple of handfuls of peanuts

So cream the butter, then add the sugar and beat together until it’s really light.   Add the egg and vanilla and beat again until pale and fluffy.  Stir in the flour until it’s just combined, then add the chopped chocolate and nuts.

Dollop the mixture in spoonfuls onto a baking tray.  I used a tablespoon but I have also been known to use an ice cream scoop to make really massive cookies.

Bake at 180/gas 4 for about 10-12 minutes.  Don’t overcook them as you want them really lovely and soft in the middle.  Serve while still warm with a nice cup of tea.

Weekend baking: easy step by step banana bread

Banana bread

Now I’ll be the first to admit that I’m terribly wasteful with bananas.  Mr English only likes them when they’re green and unripe, and I only like them when they’re perfectly yellow.  Once they’ve ‘gone over’ I’m afraid I tend to put them in the food recycling bin.  Every so often, though, I do remember to knock up a quick banana bread.  I’m afraid I’m not sure where this original recipe came from as it’s ancient and was scribbled on a scrap of paper, but it’s very reliable and incredibly easy.  The actual amount of banana doesn’t really seem to matter, but keep it to two or three for best results.  Oh and it’s worth adding in the extra teaspoon of baking powder, even though you’re using self raising flour, just because it lightens it up a bit.

Banana Bread

100g salted butter
175g light brown sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
Splash of milk
225g self raising flour
2 or 3 over-ripe bananas
1 tsp baking powder

Firstly, assemble all your ingredients and preheat the oven to 180/gas 4.  I use a re-usable bake-o-glide sheet, but if you haven’t got one, make sure you grease your loaf tin well or use some parchment paper to line it.

Cream the butter and sugar until they’re light and creamy.  Whisk the eggs with a fork and pop in the vanilla and the splash of milk, then you can dribble them into the mixture a little at a time, beating well between dribbles (technical term).

I favour a ‘half and half’ method to incorporate all the runny stuff, but feel free to just bung it all in if you’d rather:

So now add about half the flour, give it a beat, then add the bananas, mix again, then the other half of the flour.  Don’t forget the baking powder.

Flump the mixture into the loaf tin and bake for about 45 – 50 minutes.  A skewer or knife tip pushed into the deepest part should come out clean.  If it’s not quite there, give it another five minutes.

This is also really gorgeous toasted for breakfast as well with a smear of butter.  Before long, you’ll be willing those bananas to go brown so you can make this again!

New Year wine, a lazy loaf and a clementine drizzle cake

Nigel Slater's lazy loaf

I love the time after Christmas when we have a few lazy days before everyone goes back to school and work.  We had a quiet New Year with Gary Barlow (not literally, I’m not THAT lucky).  Sam’s girlfriend has American parents and had us popping a piece of fruit into our mouths on every bong on the countdown to midnight – I think it’s a Spanish tradition, but it’s hilarious and by the last bong everyone’s cheeks were bulging and we were all drooling and laughing.

We’ve opened some really lovely wine over the festive period.  At midnight, we toasted 2014 a delicious Wolf Blass Sparkling Chardonnay Pinot Noir (on spesh at Asda at £5.75 at the moment I notice – SNAP IT UP!).  We also opened the front door to let the old year out and the new year in – think that one’s Irish.  My own favourite wine of the season was the Cune Crianza Rioja 2010  – an absolute beaut with that hint of vanilla that I seem really drawn to.  Again, on spesh at the moment I think.

Mr English is very keen on Pinot Noir.  His favourite of the season was the Californian Clos du Bois Pinot Noir (Majestic, £9.99 if you buy two American wines).  There’s something herbal about it (which doesn’t sound nice, but is) but it’s still full of really ripe fruit.  Yum.

The Big Bro recommended a splash-out Amarone, perfect for Christmas.  I’ve got this one on my wish list from Majestic: Amarone Classico ‘Vigneti di Roccolo’ 2010 Cantina Negrar.   It’s a pricey one at £23 but comes down to £18 if you buy two fine wines.  One for when the coffers have been replenished.

Baking-wise, I’m loving Nigel Slater’s wonderful lazy loaf.  It’s a soda bread, but because it’s baked in a cast iron casserole, it develops a wonderful chewy crust.  Delicious, and barely 30 minutes to make – with no kneading.  I also used up the last of the Christmas clementines with a clementine drizzle cake.  Exactly the same as lemon drizzle cake:

Clementine Drizzle Cake

3 eggs

Same weight (about 175g) of caster sugar, butter and self raising flour

Juice and zest of a couple of clementines.

So just weigh the eggs in their shells, then weigh out the rest of the ingredients to the same weight.

Beat the butter until soft, then add in the sugar and beat until light coloured and creamy.  Add the zest and juice of the clementines to the eggs and give them a quick whisk with a fork.  Add them a dribble at a time to the butter/sugar mix.

Stir in the flour, then dollop the mixture into a buttered cake tin and bake at 180 degrees/gas 4 for about 30 minutes until springy to the touch or until a knife point comes out clean.

Mix the juice of a final clementine with a  couple of teaspoons of sugar and drizzle over the warm cake.  Delicious.

Clementine drizzle cake

 

In pupster news, she’s settling in really well, has made a best friend at puppy classes (a cute and ridiculously soft Vizsla called Ellie) and thinks having everyone at home over Christmas is wonderful!

 

Cute

English Mum’s Big Christmas Bakeoff – the entries

Ah I’ve absolutely loved looking through all the amazing bakeoff entries. Now it’s down to our lovely judge Catriona to choose a winner to receive all those lovely Yeo Valley goodies. Good luck everyone!

Joanna Arthur's mince pies

Joanna Arthur’s mince pies

Rich Tipsy fruity Yule log by Ah Har Ashley

Rich Tipsy fruity Yule log by Ah Har Ashley

Lisa Ann Tebbutt's Christmas cake

Lisa Ann Tebbutt’s Christmas cake

Lexy Law's chocolate yule log

Lexy Law’s chocolate yule log

Sara Friend's giant cupcake

Sara Friend’s giant cupcake

Peggy Falbos chocolate fudge cake with white chocolate mascarpone mousse topped with a chocolate meringue

Peggy Falbo’s chocolate fudge cake with white chocolate mascarpone mousse topped with a chocolate meringue

Natalie Zindani's Christmas cupcakes

Natalie Zindani’s Christmas cupcakes

Lynn Savage's After Eight cupcakes

Lynn Savage’s After Eight cupcakes

Katharine Bourne-Francis' enormous choux bun

Katharine Bourne-Francis’ enormous choux bun

Lorraine's Christmas cranberry, orange and white chocolate cake

Lorraine’s Christmas cranberry, orange and white chocolate cake

Kim Holgate's apricot and brandy Christmas cake

Kim Holgate’s apricot and brandy Christmas cake

Lianne O'Malley's igloo cake

Lianne O’Malley’s igloo cake

Little Lydia (and the Christmas cake!) from Kristin Burdsall

Little Lydia (and the Christmas cake!) from Kristin Burdsall

Liz Jarvis's Christmas shortbread cookies

Liz Jarvis’s Christmas shortbread cookies

Hazel Smithies' Christmas cake

Hazel Smithies’ Christmas cake

Haward family's chocolate Christmas cottage cake

Haward family’s chocolate Christmas cottage cake

Gill Saunders (and family) snowman cake pops

Gill Saunders (and family) snowman cake pops

Fiona Haward's stained glass window biscuits

Fiona Haward’s stained glass window biscuits

Emma Ellams' victoria sponge

Emma Ellams’ victoria sponge

Becky Shorting's Christmas cookies

Becky Shorting’s Christmas cookies

Becky Thorn's Christmas tree cakes

Becky Thorn’s Christmas tree cakes

Becky Thorn's gingerbread stars

Becky Thorn’s gingerbread stars

Chocolate carrot nutty cake by Victoria Ashley

Chocolate carrot nutty cake by Victoria Ashley

Christine (@afamilyday)'s reindeer

Christine (@afamilyday)’s reindeer

Adele Knight Christmas cupcakes

Adele Knight Christmas cupcakes

How to make mince pies – step by step

Tree mince pie small

So Mr English is home and the Christmas preparations can begin in earnest.  His favouritest thing in the whole world at Christmas time is a home made mince pie.   If you’ve only ever bought them, you’re missing a trick – they’re very easy and they make the whole house smell divine.  I love scenting the pastry with the zest and juice of a clementine, or you could try a teaspoon of cinnamon too, or just leave it plain – it’s your pie.  Here’s what you’ll need:

200g cold butter

400g plain flour

1 tbsp caster sugar

Pinch salt

1 egg

1 clementine or tangerine, zest and juice (optional)

Cold water and a tablespoon (have them ready)

First, then, cut your butter into little cubes and pop it into the food processor with the flour, sugar and a pinch of salt:

Butter small

Mix gently until it resembles breadcrumbs:

Breadcrumby

Now add the egg and the clementine juice and zest and let it continue stirring gently until the mixture just comes together.   Add a couple of tablespoons of cold water as it’s coming together so you end up with a nice, soft dough.  Obviously you can do this by hand if you don’t have a food processor.

Form the dough gently into two balls, clingfilm them and put them into the fridge for 20 mins.  Don’t leave them too long – rock hard pastry is not the easiest thing to handle.  One ball should make 12 pies.

Preheat the oven to 190 degrees/gas 5 and get ready to mess with your mincemeat.  Now, don’t get me wrong – normal mincemeat in a jar is fine, but let’s face it, there’s not much in life that can’t be improved with a bit of alcohol (trust me, it’s not time that’s a great healer, it’s booze), so splosh some in: I’m loving Pedro Ximenez at the moment, but anything will do: port, cherry brandy, Cointreau – whatever you have to pep it up.  I also add a handful of dried cranberries because I like the colour.  I’m also partial to a glacé cherry or two.  But don’t bother if you don’t want to.

So now, just roll the pastry out and use a cutter to make circles.  Pop the circles gently into a muffin tin and put a scant teaspoon of your boozy mincemeat in each one.  Don’t overfill or they’ll ooze everywhere and be very difficult to get out of the tin (sorry for the blurry picture – sticky hands) :

Pies

Now you can either cut out another slightly smaller circle to use as a lid, or just cut out something festive like a star or a tree, and pop on the top.  Now, pass the whole kit and caboodle onto the Eggy Wash Department (you’ll need a small, willing child for this – just use a little lightly beaten egg to paint over the pies and add a sprinkle of sugar):

Bake for about 10 – 15 minutes and that’s it, you made pies!  Give yourself a quick round of applause, then serve with more booze in the shape of some warm, mulled wine, or a lovely cup of tea.  And now you’ve got into the swing of it, try mixing it up.  The tree ones at the top were made in a deep-fill muffin pan with a plain cutter.  Or try topping your pies with sponge mixture like my festive pastry cakey pies.

star mince pies

The Sunday Times Ultimate Cookbook – part 4: dinner party

The Ultimate Cookbook - Part 4 - front cover

Sadly, this weekend is the last in the series of the fabulous Sunday Times Ultimate Cookbook.  I’ve really enjoyed being given a sneak peek at all the fabulous recipes in the series and trying out cooking some new (and famous) recipes.  So far, we’ve had The Sunday Lunch editionQuick Eats, and Brunch and Baking and this week, going out with a bang (literally – read on), it’s time for the dinner party edition.

I love entertaining, but if you’re attempting a recipe with any kind of wow factor, you need to know that you’re not going to spend the entire evening in the kitchen, missing out on spending time with your guests.  The cleverest dinner party recipes are those that look impressive without being too complicated and time consuming.  This collection has been cleverly compiled to reflect the very best of that ethos.

Michael Caines’ curried carrot soup makes a delicious starter (and a nice family supper with a big pile of crusty bread too, I would imagine), and gorgeous Nigella’s (#teamNigella) wonderful coca cola baked ham  is my go-t0 recipe for our Christmas ham joint.  Gordon Ramsay’s cherry clafoutis recipe includes a batter that you can make the day before, meaning you’re ready to pop out to the kitchen, pour the batter and bake, then dash back to your guests.

But wait, just wait until you’ve checked out the lush, velvety fabulousness of The River Café’s Chocolate Nemesis.  Not quite a cake, but not really a mousse either, there’s enough whisking and stirring to make you feel like you’ve made an effort, but you serve it cool which means you can make it in advance.

Now for my confession.  It was all going so well – eggs whipped to fluffy lightness, chocolate and butter melted, syrup done… mixed and into the oven, baked to perfection and then…

Reader, I dropped it.

Dropped chocolate nemesis cake

Totally my own fault. The recipe clearly says ‘leave to cool in the tin before turning out’ and I just didn’t see it.  I tried to balance it on a tin to push the loose base up, realised the base was still bloody hot, fumbled…

And the whole lot fell over.  I honestly could have cried.

Still, plopped into a bowl and lavished with cream it was still utterly delicious.  Soft and dense and moussey in texture. You live and learn, eh?

Get your copy of The Sunday Times Ultimate Cookbook: Dinner Party this weekend. Featuring a selection of the finest recipes of the celebrity chef era, The Ultimate Cookbook is part of The Incredible Edibles Food Series dedicated to food and dining.

Visit thesundaytimes.co.uk to subscribe and to find out more details about exclusive Times+ chef events, hosted at some of the country’s best restaurants.

The Sunday Times Ultimate Cookbook – part 3: Brunch and Baking

The Ultimate Cookbook - Part 3 - front cover

So following on from my first post about the Sunday Times Ultimate Cookbook, the Sunday Lunch edition, and last weekend’s Quick Eats, this weekend I’m really excited that Brunch and Baking are on the menu.

Being rather late weekend risers, we’re big fans of brunch in this household.  Leafing through the recipes (once again, I got a little early sneak peek), I was delighted to see such diverse brunch dishes as classic eggs Benedict from Le Caprice, and fresh and funky fried eggs with radicchio and torn bread from lovely Aussie Bill Granger.

Obviously I’m a huge baking fan, and Mary Berry’s beautiful whole orange spice cake is one that I’ll be bookmarking for some lazy Saturday afternoon baking very shortly.  But for me, it had to be a rather amazing recipe by one of my biggest culinary girl crushes, the Sunday Times’ own gorgeous Gizzi Erskine.  Gizzi’s millionaire’s shortbread has the clever addition of rosemary in the caramel.  The boys initially turned up their noses, but as the caramel bubbled on the stove, and the delicious sweet, herbal scent filled the house, everyone was strangely drawn towards the kitchen to have a taste.

Because I’m lazy, I made the shortbread in the KitchenAid, which took about two seconds (I’ll be using this recipe next time I bake shortbread), but the whole recipe represents everything I love about cooking: pressing soft dough crumbs into the baking tin, melting chocolate and stirring sweet, bubbling caramel.  The very best form of kitchen therapy.

The finished article, with its buttery shortbread, thick caramel and crisp chocolate top, is a bit of revelation, with the rosemary adding a rounded edge which is the perfect foil to the sweetness.  Deeeelicious.

Gizzi Erskine rosemary millionaire's shortbread

 

Get your copy of The Sunday Times Ultimate Cookbook: Brunch & Baking this weekend, the third in a four-part series.

Featuring a selection of the finest recipes of the celebrity chef era, The Ultimate Cookbook is part of The Incredible Edibles Food Series dedicated to food and dining.

The final edition in the series is Dinner Party next Sunday.

Visit thesundaytimes.co.uk to subscribe and to find out more details about exclusive Times+ chef events, hosted at some of the country’s best restaurants.

Spooky Halloween cupcakes

PumpkinsNow I’m not the world’s most creative person (as some of my photos on here will testify), but as I mentioned the other day, I was desperate to make some pumpkin cupcakes.  Charlie’s buddy James is 16 this week (more of this later) and I thought I’d knock up a couple for him to take to the party (obviously first checking that this was ‘the done thing’ – it’s okay, apparently it is, as long as they’re ‘not crap’).

I started out with a basic sponge cake mix and added some little fudgey chunks.  Once the cakes were baked I got busy with the fondant.  I coloured the fondant with tangerine colouring paste (my hands are now a fetching shade of orange) and pushed the marks into the pumpkins with a spoon.   I made the brown stalk colour by adding a bit of navy to some tangerine fondant.  Add a bit of green buttercream, a few spooky sweets, et voila!

Halloween cupcakes

 

Easy no yeast, no knead, no rise, shallow-fry doughnuts

Doughnuts

Now that autumn’s here I’ll be very happy to move back towards comfort foods: soups, stews, pies.. all the things I missed all summer!  I love a bit of experimentation in the kitchen and have been fiddling with this doughnut recipe.  We love doughnuts, and I’ve made them before, but the deep frying is a pain and I’m a bit dangerous with hot oil, so I wanted to make some that you could fry in less oil, just in a frying pan.  Now don’t get me wrong, these aren’t diet doughnuts or anything, you’ll still need a good 1/2 inch of oil in the pan, but it’s a lot better than dragging out your deep fat fryer or having bubbling saucepans of oil on the stove.  Plus there’s no yeast, no kneading, no rising, and they still taste amazing.

You will need:

For frying:

A medium frying pan with about 1/2″ of oil in the bottom. I use rapeseed.  I measured, and for my 10″ pan I used about 500ml.

Wet ingredients:

50g butter, melted

50g caster sugar

125ml milk

Squeeze of lemon

Dry ingredients:

160g plain flour

A pinch of salt

2 tsp baking powder

Sugar, for coating

So firstly, get the oil heating up in the frying pan.   Do it just on a medium heat so it heats slowly and safely.  It needs to be about 180 degrees C so a thermometer will help here.  I use a jam thermometer.

Measure out the butter and melt it in a jug in the microwave or in a saucepan.  Add in the caster sugar, milk and lemon juice.  It all curdles and looks hideous, but don’t worry.  Don’t omit the lemon juice, it’s important.

Now, measure out all the dry ingredients and pour the wet into the dry, stirring briefly until you’ve got a soft dough.  You might not need all the liquid.  You need it just firm enough so that you can form them into small balls with your hands.

So when the oil is up to temperature, start forming the doughnuts into small balls (I used a smallish dessertspoonful per doughnut).  Remember, you want them fluffy and light inside, so handle them really gently – just enough for form them into a ball – then straight (carefully) into the oil.  When the undersides are golden brown, flip them over with some tongs and cook the other side.  Lift them out and drain them briefly on some kitchen paper, then toss them while still warm in the sugar.

Serve them straight away while they’re still warm.  Next thing I’m going to invest in is a cooking syringe so that I can put jam in the middle, but we just dunked them in the jam.  Still fabulous.

Oh, and they won’t keep, but then I don’t think that will ever be a problem.

Doughnut and jam

An autumn update and lemon drizzle cake

Lemon drizzle cake - ENGLISH MUM

So after three weeks of back to back holidays, I have a huge amount to write, but I’m taking my time, settling back home, attacking the Giant Washing Mountain of Buckinghamshire, and doing a bit of nesting.

I love our house and, although I’ve loved every minute of gallivanting about on the med, it’s just been wonderful to come back to English Towers, find my slippers (although one was populated by a spider of epic proportions that prompted much hopping about and squealing), dig out my jimjams and kick back with a cuppa and a magazine.  I’m having a bit of a magazine crisis at the moment.  I’ve gone off my old favourite so I’ve been buying a few different ones to try them out. This one is really good.  One of my Instagram friends described it as a ‘lovely cosy warm jumper’

The Simple Things

But most of all it’s been lovely to get back in the kitchen and baking again.  On Sunday, we had a Moroccan chicken pilaf (an easy, one-pot wonder) and then lemon drizzle cake (which seemed somewhat apt as we sat at the table and watched the drizzle in the garden):

Lemon Drizzle Cake

170g butter
170g golden caster sugar
170g self raising flour
3 large free range eggs (duck eggs are fab for baking if you can find them)
2 large unwaxed lemons
2 tbsp icing sugar, sifted

So it starts off just as a normal ‘pound cake’ really.  Weigh everything out first, then cream the butter and the sugar until it’s really pale (preferably with an electric whisk – this should be really light).

Break the eggs into a bowl and add the juice and finely grated rind of one of the lemons, then it’s easy to just dribble it into the butter and sugar mixture, beating all the time.

If, when adding the eggs, the mixture starts to curdle, just add a tablespoon of the flour – this will bring it back together.  Now stir in the flour until it’s just combined.

Pour into a buttered loaf tin and bake at 180 degrees/gas 4 for about 30 – 40 minutes.  Check to see if it’s done by popping a skewer into the centre. It should come out clean.  If not, put it back in for 5 minutes.

Bring it out of the oven.  Put the zest and juice of the second lemon into a bowl and whisk in your sifted icing sugar, then carefully take the cake out of the tin and spoon the lemony liquid all over the top of the cake.  Serve at once with lots of cream or ice cream.  Or leave to cool and scoff with a cup of tea. Either way, it’s divine.

Lemons for lemon drizzle